Sunday, October 17, 2010

Is touching like shopping?

I do not know who wrote this story but I love it.

A guy's wife wanted to know why is it when she is all touchy-feely and flirtatious, her husband views it as an invitation to sex. “Why can't it just rest at what it is and nothing more?” she asked. To demonstrate, one weekend he took her to her favorite clothing store at the mall.

They walked around a bit and when she asked if he liked a certain skirt he said, "Sure… wow.... I really like that skirt. Hang onto it!" She then found a blouse and they went through the same routine. A pair of slacks... same. Boots... same. After some time she had a fair mountain of clothing and accessories on her arms and she said, "Thanks honey.. I think I am done. Let’s go check out."

With a puzzled look on his face he asked, “Check out? Why do you see this as an invitation to buy all this stuff? Can't we just look at it all, touch it and feel it without actually making a purchase? Can't we just let it rest on your arms for a while and then go home and nothing more?"

4 comments:

bunnyhunch said...

The story is a perfect representation of what I did to my dh for many years: Craving physical and emotional affection, I flirted a lot, made promises... and all too often failed to follow through, not understanding why it had to lead to sex. Why couldn't he just enjoy the flirtations? Too bad I didn't read that story years ago.

I understand now, and DH knows that should I ever again fail to be generous, he is to take me to task. Now that he gets all the sex he wants and then some, I get all the affection I crave as well. Funny how that works!

Thanks for the story. Think I'll hold onto it.

Gemma said...

Today is a new day, bunnyhunch. No guilt from the past.

A Tourist on Earth said...

A good point brought home with real punch. Communication is at the heart of the tale. It would seem the wife wanted attention and the husband wanted physical interaction, in this case sex.

If you have never read it then I can't recommended Gary Chapman's 'The Five Love Languages' enough. It covers exactly this sort of issue, where spouses find love communicated more strongly in different ways.

job29man said...

In our marriage, it's less like shopping, and more like playing chess, i.e. "touch is move."

You touch the chess piece, you committed to moving THAT piece, and soon.